philamuseum:

Forty-five years ago this month, the Woodstock Music Festival changed the world as over 400,000 people converged on a rural farm in Bethel, NY, to enjoy “An Aquarian Exposition: Three Days of Peace and Music.” The weekend became a pivotal moment in music and the counterculture movement. Like the Woodstock musicians, artists of the time expressed their concerns over social issues, such as the Civil Rights Movement and the Vietnam War. William Copley addressed the same concerns two years earlier with this screenprint, which was featured in “Artists and Writers Protest Against the War in Vietnam, 1967.” How has the counterculture movement, home or abroad, been effective in our modern times?”Untitled (Think),” 1967, by William Nelson Copley, published by Artists and Writers Protest, Inc., New York

philamuseum:

Forty-five years ago this month, the Woodstock Music Festival changed the world as over 400,000 people converged on a rural farm in Bethel, NY, to enjoy “An Aquarian Exposition: Three Days of Peace and Music.” The weekend became a pivotal moment in music and the counterculture movement.

Like the Woodstock musicians, artists of the time expressed their concerns over social issues, such as the Civil Rights Movement and the Vietnam War. William Copley addressed the same concerns two years earlier with this screenprint, which was featured in “Artists and Writers Protest Against the War in Vietnam, 1967.”

How has the counterculture movement, home or abroad, been effective in our modern times?

Untitled (Think),” 1967, by William Nelson Copley, published by Artists and Writers Protest, Inc., New York

Reblogged from philamuseum